Mississippi River BasinPhoto Gallery

Isle de Jean Charles


ISLE de Jean Charles is disappearing into Terrebonne Bay due to subsidence, rising sea levels, and possible underground/underwater shifts due to removal of oil and gas reserves. The island, formerly 5 miles wide and 11 miles long with 300 homes, is now just 1/4 mile wide and 2 miles long with only 25 homes. The Native Americans remaining on the island can no longer rely on their self-sustaining culture of raising pigs and cattle, fishing, hunting and farming. The soil is too saline for gardening, the trees have died, there’s no land for livestock, and fisheries are dwindling due to increased salinity, pollution and the BP oil spill.

More information can be found on NWNL’s Isle de Jean Charles videos page.


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View north inside the levee
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Homes inside the levee
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Jamie Dardar, fisherman
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Crabbing on the causeway
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Laughing gull on the causeway
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Dead trees
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Kayaker along the causeway
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